News

2016.02.04 Press Release

Maternal dietary imbalance between omega-6 and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids impairs neocortical development via epoxy metabolites

A research group led by Professor Noriko Osumi of the Department of Developmental Neuroscience at the Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine has clarified the effect of excess omega-6 fatty acid intake by pregnant female mice on the offspring.

The research group showed that feeding an n-6 excess/n-3 deficient diet by pregnant mice was resulted in impaired neocortical neurogenesis of the offspring. A systematic mediator lipidomics screen identified key mediators including epoxy metabolites. Interestingly, although the offspring were raised on a well-balanced n-6:n-3 diet, they showed more anxiety-related behavior compared with control animals. These findings strongly indicated that excess maternal intake of n-6 PUFAs combined with insufficient intake of n-3 PUFAs causes abnormal brain development that can have long-lasting effects on the offspring's mental state. The research results have been published in the online version of the Stem Cells.

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[Contact]
(About the research)
Professor Noriko Osumi
Department of Developmental Neuroscience, Center for Neuroscience
United Centers for Advanced Research and Translational Medicine
Tohoku University School of Medicine
Tel: +81-22-717-8203
Email: osumi*med.tohoku.ac.jp (Replace * with @)

(Pubilic Relations)
Hitoshi Inada
Public Relations Office
Tohoku University School of Medicine
Tel: +81-22-717-7891
Email: hinada*med.tohoku.ac.jp (Replace * with @)